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Most of our CDs have been imported from Europe or Asia. They are not all shrink-wrapped, and I am not going to con you by wrapping them here just to make you think they have been sterilized in America. I guarantee that the CDs and the contents are all brand new and in perfect condition. Whenever I can, I use recycled shipping materials. They may not look as pretty on the outside, but they save money and keep the trash dumps a little bit emptier.
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Results for: hungary

Balogh Kálmán and Gipsy Cimbalom Band - Aroma
2003 release by Hungary's best known player of the hammer-dulcimer (cimbalom), accompanied by a stellar group of musicians on guitar, bass, violins, horns, derbouka and vocals. Stellar, as always.

Gabor Gado - Modern dances for the advanced in age
Hungarian guitarist Gábor Gadó and his ensemble offer "a tongue-in-cheek sextet rounded out by a pair of saxes, trumpet, trombone, bass and drums... a certain down-at-the-heels dancehall feel: odd time changes, droll, edgy tango, cha cha and calypso, a guitar owing as much to Hendrix, Hawaii and heavy metal as to Wes Montgomery and George Benson, while the spirits of Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini drift by for the album closer, 'Moon River,' a place you've never been but might want to reconnoiter." - RootsWorld

Mihaly Borbely Quartet - Meselia Hill
Mihály Borbélyplays clarinet and jazz saxophone as well kaval flute and tárogató (a wooden soprano saxophone) joined by an ensemble of piano, bass and drums with guests Zoltán Lantos (violin) and Miklós Lukács (cimbalom). Says Michael Stone in RootsWorld, "If Bartók played not-so-straight-ahead jazz, it might sound like the Borbély Quartet, combining Serbian, Slovak, Gypsy, Jewish and German folk influences with classical music, shot through with that thing that swings. Roland Kirk would understand."

Nigun - KlezJazz
This Hungarian bands mixes Jewish music (folk, klezmer, Sephardic, and sacred) with jazz and free-improvisative elements. This music is characterized by both the melodic turns of Jewish music and improvisational elements. The aim of Nigun is not only preserving heritage but creating new values.

Eletfa - Gyokereink (Our Roots)
US based Hungarian band preserves the roots for a new generation, bringing the music, stories and dances of eastern Europe to life

Dallam-Dougou - New Destiny
A unique ensemble of African and European-American musicians, who merge the dougou (place) of west African with the dallam (melody) of Hungary to create a new musical sound completely imaginary and completely original.

Kiss Ferenc - Sounds of seven towers
Features the a decade-plus of programme music pieces composed by Ferenc Kiss. Among others we can hear the world-famous composition written for the Hungarian Pavilion, which was designed by Imre Makovecz for the Expo 1992 in Seville; the accompanying music written for the folk-dance gala programme at the Szeged Open Air Festival; some music excerpts to the dance choreographies by Jolán Foltin and other rarities.

Elmer Balasz Group - Around the world
The Hungarian drummer and his ensemble of piano, bass, guitar and percussion in a set of jazz based on Hungarian roots, with Mihály Dresch on flute, David Yengibarjan on accordion, and vocalists Gábor Winand and Henriett Czerovszky.

Mihaly Dresch Quartet - Argyelus
Hungarian saxophonist and compoer Mihály Dresch 's 2007 release. The artist says: I have the feeling that people today are missing a kind of organic musical culture based on a clear overview of a system, typical for example of traditional Indian music or the Transylvanian music of our ancestors. Yet it would seem that at present we are unable to create a new musical system at this level, so we try, piecemeal fashion, to tack together the systems we consider important. The result of this 'piecing together' is inevitably a fragmentary culture. Listen

Mihaly Borbely Quartet - Meselia Hill
Mihály Borbelyplays clarinet and jazz saxophone as well kaval flute and tárogato (a wooden soprano saxophone) joined by an ensemble of piano, bass and drums with guests Zoltán Lantos (violin) and Miklos Lukács (cimbalom). Says Michael Stone in RootsWorld, "If Bartok played not-so-straight-ahead jazz, it might sound like the Borbely Quartet, combining Serbian, Slovak, Gypsy, Jewish and German folk influences with classical music, shot through with that thing that swings. Roland Kirk would understand."

La Campagnie des musiques a ouir - La manivelle magyare
Three talented young French musicians, Denis Charolles, Frederic Gastard and Christophe Monniot produce the sound of a 25-piece orchestra, with a repertoire that extends from popular folk numbers, to pop music, to their own compositions. It's all quite mad and challenging, all the more so by the inclusion of three of Hungary's best and most adventurous jazz musicians: guitarist Gábor Gado, pianist Bela Szakcsi and violinist Balázs Bujtor.

De-Alfoldi Saxophone Ensemble - Totagas
When Hungarians want to say that too many cooks spoil the broth, they say that 'two pipers in the same inn are one too many.' Yet these three pipers (saxophonists) get on like a house on fire. They are: Bela Agoston, Bela Burány and Balázs Szokolay. Joined by Robert Benko on double bass and Tamás Geröly Sándor on drums, they cook up a storm of reeds both rattling and sublime.

Gabor Gado - Modern dances for the advanced in age
Hungarian guitarist Gábor Gado and his ensemble offer "a tongue-in-cheek sextet rounded out by a pair of saxes, trumpet, trombone, bass and drums... a certain down-at-the-heels dancehall feel: odd time changes, droll, edgy tango, cha cha and calypso, a guitar owing as much to Hendrix, Hawaii and heavy metal as to Wes Montgomery and George Benson, while the spirits of Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini drift by for the album closer, 'Moon River,' a place you've never been but might want to reconnoiter." - RootsWorld

various artists - Sereny Magyaros
Whistle music from Moldavia, Hungary

Ferenc Kiss - Cigany Torveny / Romani Kris (Gypsy Law)
Music from the film by Bence Gyongyossy

Dresch Quartet - Tul a Vizen
More brilliant jazz from Hungary, deep in traditional roots, high on the creative scale. featureing Mihaly Dresch on saxophone, flutes, cimbalom, and vocals, with an ensemble of drums, bass and Ferenc Kovacs on violin and trumpet

Dresch Dudas Mihaly Quartet - Reveszem, Reveszem
Jazz quartet explores Hungarian folk themes

Budapest Klezmer Band - Train 7.40
Besides traditional Jewish compositions, the album contains pieces from the Budapest production of'Fiddler on the roof'.

Kovács Ferenc - Magony
A solo album by the violin soloist of Djabe, Kalman Balogh's Gypsy Cimbalom Band and Dresh Quartet.

Transsylvanians - Igen!
They call it 'Hungarian speedfolk' and it does have velocity. This mostly-acoustic ensemble's high-octane brand of folk encompasses the eastern and western with ease and attitude.

Zsaratnok - The Balkan Move
Nicola Parov and his ensemble from Hungary

various artists - Csillagok, Csillagok (Stars, stars)
Subtitled 'Celebration Of Hungarian Music,' it is surely a party, with an excellent cast of contributors including Éva Korpás, Agi Szaloki, Robert Lakatos, Mihály Dresch, Ferenc Kovács, Kálmán Balogh and many others, in a set of songs given personal settings by the artists

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