Laye Sow - Djamano - CD
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Laye Sow
Djamano (Orange World)

OK, it has been done before, and done well, so why should you listen to another Malian-blues collaboration? Perhaps because this one really works well, because the players are excellent, no one tries to steal the show, and the songs are always the primary focus of this collaboration between Senegalese singer and guitarist Laye Sow and American guitarist Richard Caswell and American bass/percussionist Steve Marshall. No flash, no funk, no pyrotecnic displays of gadgetry and wizardry, just some musicians getting together to share their roots and diversity.

Listen:
Kairaba
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The record label press:
Laye Sow is a Fula, from Podor in the Futa Toro region of Northern Senegal, on the Mauritanian border. He was brought up on the African tradition of storytelling through song. He is often described a Muslim mystic. Laye is deeply spiritual which you can easily traced in all his songs. However he is first and foremost an African and the rights and wrongs of African society, as well as the weaknesses that create division, consume him. In 2003 Laye's Mbalax band, Jelitara Futa, toured the festivals in the UK. There he met blues guitarist Richard Caswell. This union resulted in an extraordinary fusion between Senegalese tradition and American blues which you can hear at "Djamano". Laye was lead singer with the National Band of Senegal for 3 years. He is cousin of Baaba Maal and they have occasionally collaborated.

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